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The discovery workshop made simple: your step‑by‑step guide

How to run a one-day Agile project kick-off workshop that sets you up for success

Get everything you need to run a practical discovery workshop that kicks off your project the way you plan to continue.

Inspire and align your team behind a common vision of the outcomes you want to achieve, and the steps you need to take to get there. Ruthlessly prioritise only what’s needed to create a product your customers will love. Move step-by-step from discovery to development in the space of day.

Your complete project discovery kit in one PDF

kickoff-kit-ipad-placeit

The Agile Project Kick-off Kit gives you the tools, templates and tips you need to get your project off to a successful start.

"Brilliantly done - very impressive."

— Jimmy Ling, Agile Delivery Lead, NAB

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JUMP TO CHAPTER
  • Introduction
  • 01

    About this guide

  • 02

    Running the workshop

  • 03

    Product Vision

  • 04

    Press Release

  • 05

    Elevator Pitch

  • 06

    Success Sliders

  • 07

    Pragmatic Personas

  • 08

    User Story Mapping

  • 09

    Prioritisation

  • 10

    User Story Writing

  • 11

    Team Charter

  • 12

    You’re good to go

An Agile coach at a project board planning an Agile kick-off workshop with her team. An Agile coach at a project board planning an Agile kick-off workshop with her team.
01 Chapter 1

About this guide

What is product discovery?

Project discovery is the art and science of answering key questions about the product you plan to build.

This workshop will help you discover:

  • how your product will make the world a better place
  • who your customers are and how your product will improve their lives
  • what sets your product apart in the market
  • what success looks like
  • everything your customers will want to do with your product and how you can chop this into manageable chunks of work
  • the minimum you can do to build a product your customers will love to use
  • and how you’re going to work as a team to deliver this.

Who is the guide for?

The guide is for anyone planning an Agile project discovery workshop.

You may be:

  • the Product Owner or project lead
  • Scrum Masters, Agile Coaches or other facilitators
  • developers or stakeholders wanting to prepare for a workshop
  • new to Agile or an old hand
  • developing software or some other product, policy, plan, resource or research programme.

What’s in the guide?

This guide includes:

  • an example discovery workshop agenda
  • step-by-step instructions for running the workshop
  • templates for the activities
  • example deliverables
  • alternative activity options
  • facilitation tips and tricks.
A Boost Agile coach discussing options for a discovery workshop agenda at the company's portfolio board. A Boost Agile coach discussing options for a discovery workshop agenda at the company's portfolio board.
02 Chapter 2

Running the discovery workshop

Here’s an example one-day agenda for a discovery workshop to kick-off an Agile project. Learn what each activity achieves, who to invite and get tips for running the workshop.

Discovery workshop agenda

This agenda is designed to set you up to start building your product the very next day. It’s just one possible agenda though. You can pick the activities that are the best fit for your project or pull in other activities. Check out Jonathan Rasmussen’s project inception deck for some other ideas.

Activity Duration
Introductions 10 minutes
Product Vision 45 minutes
Press Release 45 minutes
Break 10 minutes
Elevator Pitch 30 minutes
Success Sliders 20 minutes
Pragmatic Personas 45 minutes
Lunch 30 minutes
User Story Mapping 90 minutes
Prioritisation 30 minutes
Break 10 minutes
User Story Writing 90 minutes
Team Charter 20 minutes

Who to invite to the discovery workshop

You want to combine insight into your customers’ needs with expertise in meeting these needs. So you need:

  • the Product Owner (of course)
  • stakeholders
    • customer experts (call centre, help desk, front-of-house, sales, marketing and research staff, owners of similar products)
    • high-influence colleagues interested in the project (lets you build buy-in and set expectations)
  • some real live customers (if possible)
  • the team (everyone needed to do the work and no-one who isn’t)
  • the facilitator (often an Agile Coach or Scrum Master).

Just as importantly, everyone who takes part needs to be engaged, open to all ideas and ready to contribute.

First up, presenting the Product Vision.

A Product Owner presents his vision for the product to the team sitting around a table at a project discovery workshop. A Product Owner presents his vision for the product to the team sitting around a table at a project discovery workshop.
03 Chapter 3

Product Vision — presentations that inspire

Presenting the Product Vision at the discovery workshop is a chance to inspire the team by depicting the better future you’ll be building. The vision brings the team together, giving them both destination and motivation.

Time Icon 45 minutes

Who delivers the Product Vision?

The Product Owner can present the vision solo or as a tag team, ideally with the chief executive or another senior leader. This shows shows that the powers-that-be are behind the project. It’s also a chance to link the project to the organisation's strategic priorities.

Painting a picture of a better world

The Product Vision explains why you’re building the product. It paints a picture of the way the product will improve the lives of your customers, and how this benefits your organisation.

The presentation:

  • describes a future state
  • makes it memorable — give an example, tell a story about a real customer, describe the before and after
  • shows ‘why’ not ‘how’ — focus on outcomes not features
  • gives the team something to refer back to when making decisions — “does this achieve the vision?”
  • gets the team excited.

Roman Pichler has put together 8 tips for creating compelling product visions.

Once your presentation is over, it’s a chance for you to answer any questions the team have.

The next two activities let the team flesh out the vision. Both the Press Release and the Elevator Pitch help the team better understand the benefits the product will bring. You can run either or both of these exercises.

The Press Release goes into more detail and focuses on benefits for both the customer and the company. The Elevator Pitch sums up in a single statement your product’s unique selling point in the marketplace.

A team sitting round a table collaborate on writing a Press Release at a project discovery workshop. A team sitting round a table collaborate on writing a Press Release at a project discovery workshop.
04 Chapter 4

The Press Release — imagine success and work backwards

Producing a Press Release is a fun way to get a shared view of your project’s purpose by touting the benefits it’ll bring.

Time Icon 45 minutes

Imagine your project is complete and you’re writing a press release to plug your awesome new product.

The Press Release activity:

  • expands on the vision
  • builds a shared understanding of your objectives
  • draws out any different viewpoints
  • highlights the product’s benefits for your customers and company
  • conjures up a picture of what the product will look like in the real world
  • gets the team excited about the difference you’ll make
  • helps you work backwards from the successful end result.

We’ve also tried the Product Box activity but we found the Press Release is better for getting everyone involved; you don’t need much in the way of artistic talent.

The Press Release template

The Press Release template we use follows Ian McAllister’s approach at Amazon.

Thumbnail of the Press Release template. Click to get a PDF of the template. Press Release template with instructions — PDF

Thumbnail of the Press Release template. Click to get a PDF of the template. Blank Press Release template — PDF

Thumbnail of the Press Release template. Click to get a PDF of the template. Example Press Release — PDF

Press Release template. Click to get a PDF of the template.

How to run the activity

Set the scene. You might say something like, “Imagine you’re in a cafe. You’ve got your coffee and cake and you’re reading the paper. Your product is live, you’ve sent out a press release and the newspaper has picked it up. What will the article say?”.

Explain that the Press Release is meant to get the reader excited. It celebrates the success of the project and highlights the way it’ll make the world a better place. Be creative. You’re after a story that people would want to read.

Don’t skip over the scene-setting — it helps people get the imagination working.

  1. Divide the group into teams of 3–4, ideally mixing up clients and development team.
  2. Give them each a big sheet of paper and coloured markers.
  3. Pass out copies of the Press Release template.
  4. Describe what’s needed in each section of the Press Release.
  5. Set them to work filling in the template. Give them 20 minutes.

If people get stuck, remind them that you’re not looking for the perfect press release; the conversation is as important as the final product. Sometimes it’s easiest to start with the Problem and its Solution. The facilitator can give people a nudge by offering another perspective.

Example press release

Check out this example press release.

What to do with your releases

Give each group a couple of minutes to present their team’s release to the workshop.

Discuss what you’ve learned. Ask the team if they noticed any:

  • common themes
  • differences
  • surprises
  • new opportunities or potential features.

Take a photo of each release. Some of our clients have liked the end result so much that they’ve circulated it internally. In this case we tend to transcribe and spruce-up the press release.

If you have a number of releases and no standout candidate, you can distil them into a single vision through the Elevator Pitch. This activity also helps the team understand how the product will be positioned in the marketplace.

A project team work on their Elevator Pitch at a discovery workshop. A project team work on their Elevator Pitch at a discovery workshop.
05 Chapter 5

The Elevator Pitch — distilling the vision

Writing an Elevator Pitch at your discovery workshop helps distil the team’s shared vision for your product, and the edge it will have against its competitors.

Time Icon 30 minutes

The Elevator Pitch gives you something that helps the team position the product in the market and promote it to stakeholders.

Elevator Pitch template

Thumbnail of the Elevator Pitch template. Click to get a PDF of the template.Elevator Pitch template — PDF

Thumbnail of the Elevator Pitch template. Click to get a PDF of the template.Example Elevator Pitch — PDF

This is based on the template from Geoffrey Moore’s book Crossing the Chasm.

For [target customers]
Who are dissatisfied with [the current market alternative]
Our product is a [new product category]
That provides [the product’s key problem-solving capability].
Unlike [the product alternative],
Our product [describe what the product does, its key features].

Example Elevator Pitch

Imagine you’ve invented sliced bread. Here’s how you might fill in the template:

For toast aficionados
Who are dissatisfied with bread you need to cut yourself
Our product is a pre-sliced loaf
That provides uniform slices of bread straight from the packet.
Unlike uncut bread,
Our product saves time and provides a consistent toasting experience.

How to run the activity

  1. Show everyone the template.
  2. Explain the purpose of the activity.
  3. Talk through the different elements of the template.
  4. Ask the team to start offering their suggestions for each element in turn.
  5. Go back and finalise each element based on the consensus.

Tips for facilitators

This activity keeps you busy as a facilitator. You need to capture suggestions as the team call them out and then identify the consensus view based on the discussions.

People can get hung up on finding the perfect wording. This conversation is valuable but you need to guard against running over time. If people fixate on individual words and phrases, listen for the essence of their ideas and offer alternative phrasings.  

You might do a couple of drafts before you get something you’re all happy with.

Next up, you take a break from thinking about what you want from the product, and start thinking about what you want from the project.

Two members of a project team discuss what the success criteria should be for their Success Sliders exercise. Two members of a project team discuss what the success criteria should be for their Success Sliders exercise.
06 Chapter 6

Success Sliders — agreeing what matters most

Success Sliders are a simple way for the team to agree on the project’s priorities. They help you kick off your project with a common understanding of what success looks like.

Time Icon 20 minutes

Success Sliders make explicit the fact that your project has finite resources and give you a transparent way to make the necessary trade-offs. Increase the scope, for example, and your project will take longer or you’ll need a bigger budget to hire more people to complete the work in the same time.

Rob Thomsett introduced the idea of project Success Sliders in his book Radical Project Management.

How to run the activity

Set up

On a poster or whiteboard, draw a grid of 6 rows by 5 columns.

Label the 6 rows with your success factors. In the example below we’ve chosen common factors for software development projects.

Number the columns 1–5.

Place post-it notes in column 3 of each row.

Prioritise your success factors

Tell the team to work together to decide the priority of each success factor. The more important the factor the higher of the number of the column it sits under. (You can have more than one post-it in each column.)

In doing this, you’re giving each factor a numerical value. But here’s the catch: the total value of all factors must equal 18.

This means that if you raise the value of one factor you’ll have to lower the value of another. The team has to agree how to balance the values for each factor to stay within the magic number.

Putting a limit on the total value reflects the real-world constraints that all projects face. It lets you kick off your project with agreed priorities.

A completed Success Sliders exercise with post-its stuck on a 5x6 table on a whiteboard so that the value for all the success factors add up to 18.

A completed Success Sliders exercise, with the total value for all the success factors adding up to 18.

Online Success Sliders tool

If you’ve got access to a big screen, you can run the activity online using a tool developed by Mountain Goat Software.

Online Project Success Sliders tool

Now you’ve agreed on the priority of your success metrics you can decide who your priority customers are, and how your product will improve their lives.

 

Customers seen from above in a mall. The pragmatic personas template gives you a usable view of the customers you're building your product for. Customers seen from above in a mall. The pragmatic personas template gives you a usable view of the customers you're building your product for.
07 Chapter 7

Pragmatic Personas — put customers at the heart of your product

Pragmatic Personas let you quickly and collaboratively turn existing customer insights into memorable characters that the team can design the product for.

Time Icon 45 minutes

Pragmatic Personas convert generic users into characters whose traits you know and whose needs you understand. They’re a fun way of keeping the customer top of mind during the discovery workshop.

Pragmatic Personas template

This template is based on Jeff Patton’s approach.

Thumbnail of the Pragmatic Personas template. Click to get a PDF of the template.Pragmatic personas template PDF

Thumbnail of the Pragmatic Personas template. Click to get a PDF of the template.Blank pragmatic personas template — PDF

Thumbnail of the Pragmatic Personas template. Click to get a PDF of the template.Example persona — PDF

Pragmatic Persona template. Click to get a PDF of the template.

Why these personas are pragmatic

These personas are pragmatic because they’re quick, collaborative, use your existing customer insights and produce something the team can easily refer to as they work. You can turn dense customer research data into something accessible and actionable. If you don’t have detailed research, you can use the collected wisdom of the group to make educated assumptions.

How to run the activity

Pass around the template or draw it on the whiteboard. Describe what’s needed in each section.

Brainstorm your key customer types and pick the top three. While “everyone” could conceivably be a customer, if you try to build a product for everyone, you won’t satisfy anyone.

You can print out the blank pragmatic personas template and get them to fill that in or give them a blank sheet and get them to draw up the template from scratch.

If you’re doing multiple personas, split into groups and tackle one persona each. Once they’re done, give each group a couple of minutes to present their persona to the workshop.

Then capture the personas and make them visible so the team and stakeholders can refer to them later.

Tips on filling in the template

Name

Alliteration helps makes the names memorable. For example, if you’re developing sliced bread, you might target two personas: Tony Toastmaker and Sally the Sandwich Addict.

Picture

You might find people start out anxious about their artistic talent but once they get going they tend to have fun. And the act of imagining what a persona looks like helps bring it to life.

Context

Keep the Context section down to a few bullet points. You can put more detail into the About section.

About

Only list characteristics of your persona that are relevant to the design of your product.

Implications

Watch out if you start listing features here. You run the risk of going into too much detail.

Example press release

Check out this example persona.

Prioritising the personas

As a group, rank the personas in order of importance. Consider who your most valuable customers are and who will get most benefit from the product.

This prioritisation is important because you’ll focus your development efforts on the top persona. To make this easier, give each persona a different coloured sticky dot. You’ll use these to tag your user stories later in the day.

Now you know who you’re building the product for, you can start building up a more detailed view of what you’re going to build. You’re ready for User Story Mapping.

A project discovery workshop facilitator places post-its on a glass wall during user story mapping. A project discovery workshop facilitator places post-its on a glass wall during user story mapping.
08 Chapter 8

User Story Mapping — plot the path to a successful product

User Story Mapping is a way of brainstorming all the work you’re going to need to do to build the product, then breaking it down into a structure that will make your development simpler and more manageable.

 Time Icon 90 minutes

User Story Mapping gives your discovery workshop two types of map. Firstly, the exercise itself guides you to the point that you can start writing user stories — short descriptions of what your customer will do when using your product. Secondly, the end result is a visual chart showing the structure of your stories. These stories and this structure will guide your development work.

You can learn more in Jeff Patton’s book User Story Mapping: Discover the Whole Story, Build the Right Product.

An outline of the structure of a user story map drawn on a whiteboard.An outline of the structure of a user story map

How to run the activity

Describe the purpose of User Story Mapping and outline the five-step process. Because it’s complicated, people might not fully grasp what’s involved initially. That’s fine, it’ll become clearer as you go.

1. Brainstorm all the user tasks

This works best as a silent brainstorm. Working alone, each participant writes down on a post-it note every step the user will take through the product from start to finish, one step per post-it. Encourage the team to think of these as actions not features by writing them with a verb at the beginning.

This phase is about breadth not depth. Tell people to be creative and try to cover every action possible. Discourage adding much detail about individual steps.

2. Organise the tasks into the order the user will complete them

Stick each post-it up on the wall in the order the users will do the tasks. This gives your story map a chronological structure.

Make sure the post-its are in a straight horizontal line. Place duplicates beside each other on the line (not above or below) to leave space for the next steps.

For example, the user tasks for making a piece of toast might be:

Photo of user tasks for making a piece of toast on post-its. These are: Buy loaf, Carry loaf home, Open bread bag, Get single slice, Place slice in toaster, Reseal bread bag, Place in freezer.

3. Group the user tasks into wider goals

As a team, look for logical groupings within your line of user tasks, collecting together all the tasks that contribute to the user achieving a wider goal. These groups are your “epics”.

Write these epic labels on wider post-its and place them above the user tasks that the epic covers. Make sure the labels will be meaningful later. Keep them brief (3-5 words should do). Again, it helps if you start with a verb.

You might group user tasks for making toast into epics like this:

Photo of the user task post-its for making toast grouped into epics as shown in the table below.

Epics Get loaf Get single slice to toast Store remainder
User tasks Buy loaf Carry loaf home Open bread bag Get single slice Place slice in toaster Reseal bread bag Place in freezer
Epics User tasks
Get loaf
Buy loaf
Carry loaf home
Get single slice to toast
Open bread bag
Get single slice
Place slice in toaster
Store remainder
Reseal bread bag
Place in freezer


4. Break down the epics into user stories

This is another silent brainstorm session.

Ask the team to think about everything that needs to be in place in your product to let the user achieve the goal of the epic. Each of these smaller units becomes the name or “stub” of a user story. Again, it’s important to write them so they’ll make sense later.

Thinking of the sliced bread example, here’s the work your team would have to do for our hungry customers to achieve these goals:

  • Get loaf – epic
    • Mix dough – user story
    • Bake dough – user story
    • Cool loaf – user story
  • Get single slice to toast
    • Place loaf in slicer – user story
    • Slice loaf – user story
  • Store remainder– epic
    • Bag sliced loaf – user story
    • Seal bag – user story

5. Place user story stubs under the relevant epic

As a team, post them up under the user tasks, and the wider epic, that they apply to. If there are duplicates, choose the best and stick that up.

To make sure your map is comprehensive, get people to walk down the line looking for gaps.

Now you’re ready to start prioritising the user stories on your map.

Photo of the user task post-its for making toast grouped into epics, and with user stories added, as shown in the table below.

Epics Get loaf Get single slice to toast Store remainder
User tasks Buy loaf Carry loaf home   Open bread bag Get single slice Place slice in toaster Reseal bread bag Place in freezer
User stories Mix dough Bake dough Cool loaf Place loaf in slicer Slice loaf   Bag sliced loaf Seal bag
Epics User tasks User stories
Get loaf
Buy loaf
Carry loaf home
Mix dough
Bake dough
Cool loaf
Get single slice to toast
Open bread bag
Get single slice
Place slice in toaster
Place loaf in slicer
Slice loaf
Store remainder
Reseal bread bag
Place in freezer
Bag sliced loaf
Seal bag
A team discuss the priority of user stories on post-its stuck to a wall. A team discuss the priority of user stories on post-its stuck to a wall.
09 Chapter 9

Prioritise User Stories — produce more value sooner

Prioritising your user stories lets you identify the business value of each story, do the most valuable work first, deliver quickly in order to get feedback, and then review the remaining work based on what you’ve learned.

Time Icon 30 minutes

Because this is an Agile discovery workshop, you’re not aiming to define all requirements, just discover the least you can do to achieve your project vision.

So now it’s time to decide which of the stories deliver the most value, most quickly.

Next, you’ll find the smallest collection of these stories that together will produce something your customers will find useful. What is the Minimum Viable Product (MVP) that will be valuable, and will let you gather valuable feedback from your customers?

You’ll then be ready to write the user stories for this MVP. These stories will guide the development of the first iteration of your product.

Prioritise user stories with personas

You’ve already ranked your personas by priority and given each of them different coloured dots. Decide which stories mainly benefit one persona and stick that persona’s dot on those stories. Straight away you can see which stories offer the most to your most valued persona.

Prioritise user stories with MoSCoW and the MVP

Next we decide which stories we Must, Could, Should and Won’t do (MoSCoW for short).

Those stories that mainly offer value to your top persona tend to be high priority, though they’re not invariably Musts.

An outline of a user story map after the stories have been prioritised.

An outline of a user story map after the stories have been prioritised

Stick three rows of tape across the wall (the green dashes above). Leave room between the strips. You’ll be grouping user story post-its between these lines.

Now move all the Musts above the top line of tape. While you’re at it, move all the other stories below the line, grouping them into Shoulds, Coulds and Won’ts. Arrange the user stories under the epic they help achieve.

You’ve now got your stories ranked in priority from top to bottom. At the top, the collection of Musts is your Minimum Viable Product.

Get the team to walk along the map and make sure these Musts are all and only the stories needed to produce a cohesive, standalone product that lets customers complete enough of their goals that they’ll adopt your offering.

The secret to prioritising user stories

Be ruthless. The critical question is whether the customer can still achieve their goal if you don’t do a particular story.

Next steps

Record the epics and all the user stories (you don’t need the user tasks). The non-MVP stories go in the backlog as a stub.

You now have a shared understanding of what’s important. Keep in mind that this understanding may change as you learn more by getting feedback on the MVP.

There are other prioritisation techniques you can use, but this one is quick enough to complete in a one-day discovery workshop.

Next up is writing user stories. You’ll only create stories for the Musts. This minimises the work you have to do before you start developing.

Project team members work on user stories at a kick-off workshop. Project team members work on user stories at a kick-off workshop.
10 Chapter 11

User Stories — writing requirements from the user’s point of view

Get the hang of writing user stories by starting with the must-do stories that make up our Minimum Viable Product.

Time Icon 90 minutes

Because they describe a feature of the product from the customer’s point of view, user stories are a great way of expressing the benefits of a project and providing a conversation centre until they have been completed.

Capturing the customer benefits in user stories

There's a simple formula for writing user stories so they focus on the customer benefit.

As an [actor] I want [action] so that [achievement].

The actor is often a type of user (and may be one of your personas). The action is what they want to do using your product. The achievement is why they want to do it — the benefit they’ll get.

So a user story for our movie theatre booking example might be:

As moviegoer, I want to choose the seats I book so that I get the best available view of the screen.

This statement of the customer benefit is the core of the user story. You can add more detail throughout the iteration as you discuss the story with the team. Learn more about how you add detail and write effective user stories in Scrum.

Writing the user stories for the MVP takes your discovery workshop to the point that you can start developing your product. So now you know what you’ll be working on, you can decide how you’ll work.

A team join hands at a project discovery workshop. The Team Charter bonds the team and builds a shared understanding and commitment. A team join hands at a project discovery workshop. The Team Charter bonds the team and builds a shared understanding and commitment.
11 Chapter 11

The Team Charter — build a better team together

Create a tight team with a shared commitment by jointly deciding how you’re going to work together.

Time Icon 20 minutes

It’s nice to cap off your discovery workshop with an exercise that bonds the team together and builds a shared understanding and commitment. You’re more likely to get a great team when the team itself sets the ground rules.

What to include in your Team Charter

You can include:

  • values
  • behaviours
  • meeting details
  • technical practices
  • communication tools
  • roles and responsibilities.

You don’t want to duplicate things like:

  • the Product Vision
  • the Definition of Done
  • technology choices.

As a rule of thumb, if your charter is too big to remember, it’s probably too big.

How to draft a Team Charter

You don’t need the stakeholders who have been part of the rest of the Kick-off, just the team — including the Product Owner — and the facilitator.

As facilitator, you should avoid making suggestions. Instead, try to ask open questions. These might be things like:

  • How do we know if someone is open to being asked for help?
  • What tells us that someone needs help?
  • How do we want to deal with electronic devices in meetings?

Capture each point, perhaps on a flipchart or whiteboard. Make sure each point clearly describes what was intended and is understood by everyone. When the points stop coming, review them all to make sure they’re relevant and there are no big gaps.

Make the Team Charter visible

It’s best to have both a physical and an electronic copy. Post the paper version beside the project board and put a photo or transcript in your digital tool.

The physical copy keeps the Charter in front of the team every day, while the digital copy is available for people working off-site and as a back-up.

Company Team Charter

As well as a Team Charter for each project, at Boost we have an overall Team Charter covering how we work as a company.

A Boost team charter.

A project board showing user stories underway following a successful Agile project discovery workshop. A project board showing user stories underway following a successful Agile project discovery workshop.
12 Chapter 12

You’re good to go

You now know why you’re building the product, who you’re building it for and how you’re going to work together.

You understand what you need to prioritise in order to deliver a working solution you can test and tweak until your customers can’t get by without it.

Ready! Set! Deliver!

Learn more about running your project kick-off workshop

Get more in-depth guidance on the activities in the discovery workshop.

Download your complete guide to project discovery

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The Agile Project Kick-off Kit collects all the tools, templates and tips you need for a successful discovery workshop into one handy 39-page PDF.

"Brilliantly done – very impressive."
— Jimmy Ling, Agile Delivery Lead, NAB

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